Blog

Fact Fluency with Multiplication Facts

I remember being promoted to fourth grade.  A summer assignment was handed to my parents, as I exited third grade, regarding my math education.  I was to return from summer break knowing my multiplication facts.   Mission accomplished. But, not so much any more. There were too many times I recall teaching fifth grade, when a … more »

Episode #1: Math is Brutally Sequential. What You Teach Matters!

Follow along, as we merge the two concepts of Shapes and Missing Addends.  Watch how the skills evolve across the grade levels.  WHAT YOU TEACH MATTERS!   When there are gaps in a students’ education, they become lost.  The concepts must build upon themselves like a Math Brick Wall.   #fill in the gaps     #buildthatwall    … more »

Math is Brutally Sequential

After 27 years in the classroom, I stepped out.  It was eye-opening.  To see a curriculum unfold across the grade levels was fascinating.  I came to quickly realize how brutally sequential Math truly is.  So many skills per grade level are key for future success. At Vimme Learning, we’ve launched a series called, “Math is … more »

E-Learning and How to Make the Leap

I’m often asked, “How should schools make the leap to e-learning”?   I taught without a Math textbook for years.  Here’s how:  A logical weekly pacing guide is the ROAD MAP, not a teacher’s manual.  A pacing guide outlines what to teach, giving teachers the latitude to teach the concept.  Weekly cumulative assessments with data warehousing … more »

Teachers and Software

Welcome to Vimme Learning! Who is better at understanding how elementary school children learn, than dedicated elementary school teachers?  Vimme Learning was created by teachers for teachers. Our team consists of experts at every grade level, 2nd -6th. We started by creating logical pacing guides, the heart and road map for our Vimme Learning teachers. … more »

Why Cumulative Assessments?

For years I witnessed my elementary students take Indiana state assessments.  It was frustrating.  My students lacked mental stamina, retention of material, and the ability to tackle rigorous questions.   I felt I was a good teacher, but my results did not reflect my efforts or those of the students. It wasn’t until I began … more »
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